Nurses dating nurses


02-Sep-2016 22:24

“When I became a nurse I didn’t think I’d ever be rich, but I did think I’d be able to go home and feel like I’d looked after people properly, but I don’t.I’m working so hard for so little, and I can’t even do my job properly.The organisation’s chief executive Janet Davis said a perfect storm of collapsing foreign arrivals in the profession due to Brexit, plummeting domestic applications, chronic low pay and high stress was pushing people out.Recent figures revealed the number of European nurses registering to work in the UK has fallen by 96 per cent since the EU referendum last June.Nurses across Britain have taken to the streets to demand the Government remove a public sector pay freeze, warning that low pay is fuelling staff shortages and risking patient safety.The 1 per cent pay cap, introduced in 2010, has seen nurses’ salaries rise below inflation – a real-terms cut of 14 per cent, according to the Royal College of Nursing (RCN).The RCN reports that there should be 340,000 nurses in the system to make sure patients are safe according to official standards, but one in nine posts – some 40,000 – are unfilled. Linda, a critical care nurse who did not wish to give her surname, said the cost of living and working in London was difficult as she is the main wage earner for herself and her husband.

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Outside the Department of Health in London, dozens of nurses and campaigners called on Jeremy Hunt to lift the pay freeze, chanting “scrap the cap” and holding banners and balloons emblazoned with messages to the Health Secretary.Do you want someone who’s physically exhausted caring for you?It’s not right.” Former nurse Assok Bukhory told he had decided to take early retirement as he didn’t want to go back”.“I’m worried about the future of the profession and how bad it’s going to get.

The staffing levels are so terrible that they’re unsafe.” Ms Gray described working on a ward as “manic” and said she had decided to change her job to work on an intensive care unit, where there is lower risk of being left to care for an unsafe number of patients.At the London protest, Lauren Gray, a 22-year-old nurse who qualified in September last year, told “nursing is on the brink of a disaster if the Government don’t listen to us”.